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Prof. Dr. Louisa Kulke

Foto von Prof. Dr. Louisa Kulke

Education

Since August 2020: Junior professor in Neurocognitive Developmental Psychology at the Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg

2018-2020: Lecturer at the department of Affective Neuroscience and Psychophysiology at Georg-August University Göttingen

2017-2018: Postdoc position at the department of Affective Neuroscience and Psychophysiology at Georg-August University Göttingen

2015-2017: Postdoc position at the department of Developmental Psychology at Georg-August University Göttingen

2012-2015: PhD studies at University College London, London, UK in Developmental Sciences (primary supervisor: Prof Janette Atkinson, formerly the late Dr John Wattam-Bell, secondary supervisor: Dr Jyrki Toumainen), research on the topic “Cortical mechanisms of visual attention in typically developing infants and adults”.

2009 – 2012: B.Sc. in Psychology at Göttingen University, passed with distinction (first class degree with honours), title of thesis: “Identity-based priming, ERPs and individual differences”

 

Research interests

Neural mechanisms of cognition and emotion and their development during infancy, childhood and adulthood, amongst others:

 

Selected Funding and Awards

May 2020: DFG grant for the project „Overt and covert attention to emotional faces in realistic social situations“

July 2019: Grant from the Diligentia Foundation in cooperation with PD Dr Alexia Gaudeul and Dr Katharina Gangl on „The effect of ethical feedback on moral behaviour among economic actors“

July 2018: Selected as one of the winners of the „Preregistration Challenge“ of the Open Science Framework

November 2017: Leibniz Science Campus Seed Fund (in cooperation with Dr Pooresmaeili and Prof Schacht) on the topic “The impacts of emotional content, reward and effort on overt shifts of visual attention”

November 2016: Leibniz Science Campus Seed Fund (in cooperation with Dr Christian Valuch) on “Developing perceptual expectations: An experimental test of predictive coding theory”

May 2014: Cecily De Monchaux Research Price 2014/2015

Jan. – Oct. 2014: DAAD (German Academix Exchange Service) PhD stipend

April 2013: Cecily De Monchaux Research Price 2012/2013

 

Selected publications

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2012

2011

Further publications and citations are listed on Google Scholar.

Reviewer activity: publons.com/a/1525420/.

 

Conference Presentations

Kulke, L. & Valuch, C. (2021). Development and relation of predictive context processing and Theory of Mind. Budapest CEU Conference on Cognitive Development. Budapest, Hungary

Kulke, L. & Hinrichs, M. (2020). Monitoring gaze during live interactions – a mobile eye-tracking study investigating Theory of Mind. Online Poster Flash of the DGPs Conference. Vienna, Austria [digitized due to pandemic].

Kulke, L. (2020). Neural mechanisms of fast and flexible attention shifts to emotional faces. Reading Emotions Symposium, Reading, UK (online).

Kulke, L. (2020). If you’re happy, do I know it? Neural mechanisms of overt attention shifts. Posterblitz der DGPA und der DGPs Fachgruppe Biologische Psychologie und Neuropsychologie.

Kulke, L., & Schacht, A. (2019). Neural mechanisms of overt attention shifts to emotional faces. Psychologie und Gehirn, Dresden, Germany.

Schacht, A., Hammerschmidt, W., Kulke, L., Kagan, I. (2019). Implicit reward associations impact face processing: Time-resolved evidence from event-related brain potentials and pupil dilations. Psychologie und Gehirn, Dresden, Germany.

Kulke, L., Lepauvre, A. & Schacht, A. (2019). Neural and behavioural trajectories of associative learning. International Society for Research on Emotion, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Kulke, L. (2019). Overt attention to physically and emotionally salient stimuli. Workshop on The Influences of Motivation and Emotion on Visual Processing. Göttingen, Germany.

Kulke, L., & Schacht, A. (2019). Late but not early Event-Related Potentials reflect emotion modulations during overt attention shifts. TEAP, London, UK.

Schacht, A., Hammerschmidt, W., Kulke, L., & Kagan, I. (2019). Implicit reward associations impact face processing: Time-resolved evidence from event-related brain potentials and pupil dilations. TEAP, London, UK.

Kulke, L., & Schacht, A. (2018). Looking at emotional faces: Neural and saccadic mechanisms of attention to salience and emotional content. DGPS Kongress. Frankfurt, Deutschland.

Kulke, L., & Rakoczy, H. (2018). Ein Test impliziter Theory of Mind mit realistischeren Stimuli. DGPS Kongress. Frankfurt, Deutschland.

Göttinger Open Source und Science Initiative der Psychologie, presented by Kulke, L. (2018). Zwei Jahre Göttinger Open Source und Science Initiative der Psychologie – ein Erfahrungsbericht. DGPS Kongress. Frankfurt, Deutschland.

Kulke, L., & Schacht, A. (2018). Early neural mechanisms of overt attention. ESCAN. Leiden, Netherlands.

Kulke, L., Atkinson, J., Braddick, O., & Schacht, A. (2018). Combining eye-tracking and EEG to measure attention to salient and emotional stimuli. Cognitive Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting. Boston, USA.

Kulke, L., & Schacht, A. (2018). Attention to emotion: a gaze-contingent eye-tracking and EEG study. Interactive Eye-Gaze Symposium. London, UK.

Kulke, L., (2017). Shifting attention to emotional stimuli – a study combining eye-tracking and EEG. DGPs Young Scientist Retreat. Marburg, Germany.

Kulke, L., Rakoczy, H. (2017). How reliable and valid are anticipatory looking measures in theory of mind task? In: Are implicit theory of mind findings robust? Some doubts from converging non-replications. Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Meeting. Austin, Texas, US.

Kulke, L., Rakoczy, H. (2017). Implicit theory of mind over the lifespan: How robust and convergent are different anticipatory looking measures?. Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Meeting. Austin, Texas, US.

Kulke, L., Rakoczy, H. (2017). Implicit Theory of Mind – replicability and validity of anticipatory looking studies. International Convention of Psychological Science. Vienna, Austria.

Kulke, L., Rakoczy, H. (2017). How robust and replicable are implicit Theory of Mind tasks? Criticism and alternative explanations. Budapest CEU Conference on Cognitive Development. Budapest, Hungary.

Kulke, L., Atkinson, J., Braddick, O. (2016). Infant brains become more efficient: Neural mechanisms of visual attention in the first year of life. International Conference on Infant Studies, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

Kulke, L. (2016). Can we measure anything non-verbally? A critical discussion of combined eye tracking and EEG. Budapest CEU Conference on Cognitive Development, Budapest, Hungary.

Kulke, L., Atkinson, J., Braddick, O. (2015). Differential brain activity in overt and covert attention shifts: Evidence from co-registered eye-tracking and EEG. European Conference on Visual Perception, Liverpool, UK.

Kulke, L., Atkinson, J., Braddick, O. (2015). How efficient is the brain? Attention development in term-born and premature infants. Neurodevelopmental Disorders Seminar, Oxford, UK.

Kulke, L., Atkinson, J., Braddick, O. (2015). Letting go: How the disappearance of a fixation target prompts the brain to shift attention. Vision Sciences Society, St Pete Beach, Florida, US.  

Kulke, L., Atkinson, J., Braddick, O. (2015). Neuronal mechanisms of visual attention: A nonverbal measure combining eye-tracking and EEG. TEAP. Hildesheim, Germany

Kulke, L., Gawryszewsky, M., Wattam-Bell, J., Atkinson, J., Braddick, O. (2014). Combining cognitive measures, eye-tracking and EEG to assess attention development. Minding the gaps: the challenges of interdisciplinary developmental science. Cambridge, UK.

Kulke, L., Wattam-Bell, J., Atkinson, J., Braddick, O. (2014). Development of neural mechanisms for spatial attention. In: Motion Processing in Typical and Atypical Development: symposium in memory of John Wattam-Bell. Perception.

Kulke, L. (2014); Development of neural mechanisms for spatial attention. European Conference on Visual Perception. Belgrade, Serbia.

Kulke, L., Wattam-Bell, J., Atkinson, J., Braddick, O. (2014); Attention Development and Early Learning: Insights From Eye-tracking Measures of Infants’ Fixation Shifts. Interntional Conference on Infant Studies, Berlin, Germany.

Kulke, L., Wattam-Bell, J., Atkinson, J., Braddick, O. (2014); Neuronal mechanisms of normal development of attention in infancy. Neurodevelopmental Disorders Series, Durham, UK.

Kulke, L. (2014). Neuronal mechanisms of development of attention in infancy. UCL Cumberland Lodge Conference, UK.

Kulke, L., Wattam-Bell, J., Atkinson, J., Braddick, O. (2014); Visual attention: Development of behaviour and brain responses. Applied Vision Association Meeting, York, UK.

Kulke, L., Wattam-Bell, J., Atkinson, J., Braddick, O. (2014) Attention Development and Learning: Recent Insights From Eye-tracking and EEG. TEAP. Giessen, Germany.

Kulke, L., Wattam-Bell, J., Atkinson, J., Braddick, O. (2013); Measuring the development of visual attention in infancy: More exact timing due to eye-tracking. CogDev Joint annual conference of the BPS Developmental and Cognitive Sections, Reading, UK.

Kulke, L., Wattam-Bell, J. (2013); Combining event-related potentials and eye-tracking to assess the effect of attention on cortical responses. 36th European Conference on Visual Perception. Bremen, Germany.

Kulke, L., Wattam-Bell, J. (2013); Combining event-related potentials and eye-tracking to assess visual attention. Birmingham Bootcamp. Birmingham, UK.

Kulke, L., Wattam-Bell, J., Atkinson, J., Braddick, O. (2013); Eye-tracking measures of visual attention in infancy. SoP/ CDCN Symposium. London, UK.

Kulke, L. (2013); Attention development in the brain: A frequency-tagging approach. UCL Cumberland Lodge Conference, UK.

Kulke, L., Wattam-Bell, J., Atkinson, J., Braddick, O. (2013); Eye-tracking measures of visual attention in infancy. Eye movement research and developmental disorders. Newcastle, UK.

Wattam-Bell J., Chiu M., Kulke L. (2012), Developmental reorganisation of visual motion pathways. i-Perception 3(4) 230.

 

You can find further information on the CV and ongoing research projects here.